Fort Yukon is on the frontlines of climate change.

 

"I grew up on the banks of the Yukon River with my grandfather. He taught me all the traditional ways of life out there in the woods," says Ronald Englishoe at the Council of Athabascan Natives tribal hall. "We used to get king salmon, 30 or 40 pounds. They were humongous. Today, we get fish that are not even eight pounds. They say, environmentally, that our weather patterns are changing. We live in a time of uncertainty."

 

"I’ve seen this climate change. I remember the old school was probably a mile down the road. It was 72 below, yet it was still mandatory. Today, I think this past winter, I have seen only a couple of days of weather that was 28 or 32 below."

FORT YUKON,  ALASKA

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